Denis R. Hirschfeldt

Department of Mathematics
University of Chicago (established 1856)
5734 S. University Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637
U.S.A.

Office: Ryerson 359B

1-773-702-7375
1-773-702-9787 (fax)

drh@math.uchicago.edu

He/Him/His



Turning Coffee into Unions: Mathematicians and Collective Bargaining (written for the upcoming proceedings of the workshop "A Conversation on Professional Norms in Mathematics", edited by Mathilde Gerbelli-Gauthier, Pamela Harris, Mike Hill, Dagan Karp, and Emily Riehl)

During #ScholarStrike (September 8th and 9th, 2020), I replaced my webpage with this page, containing a few resources outlining some of the ways in which, stated commitments notwithstanding, the University of Chicago continues its long history of complicity with and direct involvement in racist practices, and though its actions and inactions, stands in tacit opposition to the Black Lives Matter movement.

I am a member of the Just Mathematics Collective.



curriculum vitae

papers available online

Algorithmic Randomness and Complexity, by Downey and Hirschfeldt: errata, clarifications, and updates

Slicing the Truth: On the Computability Theoretic and Reverse Mathematical Analysis of Combinatorial Principles: book published by World Scientific / preprint version


Midwest Computability Seminar


University of Chicago AAUP Advocacy Chapter


University of Chicago Labor Council


"In our view, dissent and protest are integral to the life of the University. Dissent and protest should be affirmatively welcomed, not merely tolerated, by the University. Especially in a university community, the absence of dissent and protest---not its presence---is a cause for concern. The passionate expression of non-conforming ideas is both a cause and an effect of the intellectual climate that defines this University in particular. In addition, dissent and protest---and public demonstrations by groups and individuals---play a role in the University’s educational mission: being a member of an educational community that values dissent and protest is, in part, how people develop as citizens of a democracy." --- From the Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Protest and Dissent, established by the Provost of the University of Chicago in 2013